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Sources for further learning

There are numerous approaches to analyzing student work collaboratively. The following articles, books and websites provide information on these approaches. Many of them also provide examples of how teachers and administrators have used analysis of student to improve teaching and learning.


Websites

Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. Tools for school improvement.

National School Reform Faculty. http://www.nsrfharmony.org.

Looking at Student Work. http://www.lasw.org

Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (2003). Listening to student voices.

The Coalition for Essential Schools. (http://www.essentialschools.org). Looking collaboratively at student work: An essential toolkit by Kathleen Cushman.


Articles and books

Allen, D. (Ed.) (1998). Assessing student learning: From grading to understanding. New York: Teachers College Press.

Allen, D., & Blythe, T. (2003). A facilitator’s book of questions: Resources for looking together at student and teacher work. New York: Teachers College Press.

Annenberg Foundation (2001). Lessons and reflections on public school reform. New York: Annenberg.

Himley, M., & Carini, P. (2000). From another angle: Children’s strengths and school standards.  New York: Teachers College Press.

Lieberman, A. (1995). Practices that support teacher development. Phi Delta Kappan, 76, 8, 591- 596.

Lieberman, A., & Miller, L. (Eds.) (2001). Caught in the action: Professional development for teachers. New York: Teachers College Press.

Newmann, F. M., & Associates (1996). Authentic achievement: Restructuring schools for intellectual quality. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Stigler, J., & Heibert, J. (1999). The teaching gap: Best ideas from the world’s teachers for improving education in the classrooms. New York: Simon and Schuster.


References

Alexander, P., &  Murphy, P. (1998). The research base for APA’s learner-centered psychological principles.  In McCombs, B.L., & Lambert, N.L. (Eds).  How students learn: Reforming schools through learner-centered education. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Allen, D., & Blythe, T. (2003). A facilitator’s book of questions: Resources for looking together at student and teacher work. New York: Teachers College Press.

Ball, D. (1996). Teacher learning and the mathematics reform: What we think we know and what we need to learn. Phi Delta Kappan, 77, 500–508.

Cohen, D., & Hill, H. (2001). Learning policy. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Darling-Hammond, L. (1997). Doing what matters most: Investing in quality teaching. New York: The National Commission on Teaching and American’s Future.

_____ (1998). Teacher learning that supports student learning. Educational Leadership, 6-11.

Gless, J., & Moir, E. (2004). Analyzing student work: A workshop for mentors and novices. Santa Cruz, CA: The New Teacher Center, University of California.

McDonald, J. (2002). Teachers studying student work: Why and how?  Phi Delta Kappan, 84, 120-127.

McDonald, J., Mohr, N., Dicther, A., & McDonald, E. (2003). The power of protocols: An educator’s guide to better practice. New York: Teachers College Press. 

Putnam, R., & Borko, H. (1997). Teacher learning: Implications of the new view of cognition. In Biddle, B.J., Good, T.L., & Goodson, I.F. (Eds). The international handbook of teachers and teaching. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.

Wilson, S., Peterson, P., Ball, D., &  Cohen, D. (1996). Learning by all. Phi Delta Kappan, 77, 7,468-475.

____ & Berne, J.  (2001). Teacher learning and the acquisition of professional knowledge: An examination of research on contemporary professional development. In Boesel, D. (ed.), Improving teacher quality: Continuing professional development, 19–50. Washington D.C.: National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching.

Zeichner, K., & Klehr, M. (2001). Teacher research as professional development for P-12 teachers. In D. Boesel (ed.), Improving teacher quality: Continuing professional development, 147-158.  Washington D.C.: National Partnership for Excellence and Accountability in Teaching.