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Exploring content expectations—A sample chart

Jeremy is planning his middle school social studies unit on "Demography." In that unit, he would like to address this benchmark from the Inquiry Strand:

Locate and interpret information about the natural environments and cultures of countries using a variety of primary and secondary sources and electronic technologies, including computers and telecommunications where appropriate.

Jeremy plans to emphasize the thinking skill of forming generalizations to give his students an edge in meeting this benchmark. He put together this chart, following the ASSIST format:

What students need to remember to meet this benchmark

What they need to do

What they need to understand

That generalizations are patterns or trends, not specific facts.

To study data about the natural environments and cultures of countries using photographs, maps, text and data tables

That we make generalizations all the time. (They are a primary way of organizing our thoughts).

The 3 criteria for a good generalization:
a. Is it a true sentence?
b. Does it summarize a lot of data?
c. Does it provide insight?

To evaluate and refine the generalizations of others using the 3 criteria for a good generalization

That all generalizations are tentative, pending the discovery of new information.

The meaning of certain statistics that will appear in the data tables (e.g., arable land, natural increase, per capita GDP and life expectancy).
 

To discuss and deconstruct the meanings of certain statistics that will appear in the data tables

That statistics and generalizations are grand summaries that may or may not apply to any individual case.

Now choose one of your units and try making a similar chart for it.