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Classroom management rubric*

Many veteran teachers and researchers alike promote having students participate in creating the rules and procedures at the beginning of the year. Initially, by being a part of the creation of the rules, students are likely to have a larger, more fluent “buy-in”, thereby a higher likelihood of working within the rules of the class.

One way to have students become involved in the process is to have them assist in the creation of a classroom management rubric. The “look fors” ( items in the left hand column) on the rubric can be suggested by the students and/or the degree of compliance (cells on the right side of the rubric) can be defined by students. Each column of the rubric can be given a numerical value that corresponds to a grade on the report card for behavior or to be included in averaging the grade for the class.

During a class period, early in the school year, plan a class period to develop the class management rubric. A sample lesson is provided.

Engage:

At the beginning of the period, ask student table groups to quickly brainstorm the multiple places where people's actions are governed by rules. Students will suggest sports, traffic/driving, school, home, laws, etc. Once groups have several ideas listed, invite a brief report-out where groups can tell a few of their responses.

Explore:

Challenge students to look over their list of places where rules are enforced and brainstorm responses to the question, “Why are rules important?” in these settings. Invite student groups to report out their ideas.

Explain:

Explain, based on student responses, that rules are intended to provide a structure that promotes safety and fair play. Have students brainstorm scenarios where the absence of rules can cause difficulties. For example, if there were no rules to a game, what would happen? Or, if there were no rules for traffic flow, what would happen?

Elaborate:

Students brainstorm/suggest rules for the classroom that would lead to safety and fair play. These suggestions become “look fors” on the rubric and a rule for the classroom. Additionally, students or student groups create the graduated scale of behavior indicators and the point system

Evaluate

Our Classroom Expectations Rubric (sample)

 

Outstanding
Good

Unsatisfactory

On-task

The students never need to be reminded to get their work completed. When class begins, they are in their assigned seats and ready to begin. When assignments are given, the student starts right away. When working in a group, the student works with the Team to complete the activity.

The student sometimes needs to be reminded to get their work completed. When class begins, they are usually in their assigned seats and ready to begin. When assignments are given, the student often starts right away. When working in a group, the student attempts to work with the Team to complete the activity.

The student frequently needs to be reminded to get their work completed. When class begins, they are not in their assigned seats nor ready to begin. When assignments are given, the student rarely starts right away. When working in a group, the student doesn't work with the Team to complete the activity.

Social Interaction

The student never needs to be reminded to treat others with respect. They talk in soft voices during conversations. He or she never insults or belittles other classmates, either physically, emotionally or verbally. They are always willing to work cooperatively with the teacher and their classmates.

The student sometimes needs to be reminded to treat others with respect. They usually talk in soft voices during conversations. He or she rarely insults or belittles other classmates, either physically, emotionally or verbally. They are generally willing to work cooperatively with the teacher and their classmates.

The student needs frequent reminders to treat others with respect. They talk in loud voices during conversations. He or she frequently insults or belittles other classmates, either physically, emotionally or verbally. They are unwilling to work cooperatively with the teacher and their classmates.

Being Prepared

The student comes to class with Homework every day. He or she has a sharpened pencil(s), knows where to get classroom supplies and is seated at a desk when class begins.

The student usually comes to class with Homework every day and always makes up late homework. He or she usually has a sharpened pencil(s), knows where to get classroom supplies and is seated at a desk when class begins.

The student rarely comes to class with Homework each day. He or she often is without a sharpened pencil(s), is unwilling to get classroom supplies by themselves and is rarely seated at a desk when class begins.

Appearance

The student is always dressed appropriately, both for the weather and according to dress code. Their clothing is clean. The teacher does not need to remind the student to remove hats, wear belts, remove coats or arrange their clothing so that it is appropriate.

The student usually dresses appropriately, both for the weather and according to dress code. Their clothing is cleanl. The teacher rarely needs to remind the student to remove hats, wear belts, remove coats or arrange their clothing so that it is appropriate.

The student is rarely dressed appropriately for the weather or according to dress code. Their clothing is not kept clean. The teacher needs to remind the student often to remove hats, wear belts, remove coats or arrange their clothing so that it is appropriate.

*Submitted by Richard Willobee, Grand Rapids Public Schools.